Sunday, 3 March 2019

Sewing Activewear on the Brother Innov-is F420

If, like me, you're attempting to get back into or perhaps start a regular exercise routine this year you might be intrigued by the idea of sewing your own activewear. Once you've got the hang of sewing knits there's nothing to stop you doing so. It can be a lot of fun working with fabrics and techniques you might not need for sewing everyday clothing and you don't even need an overlocker. I've sewn a fair bit of it in the past but desperately needed some warmer running leggings to encourage me to get out there on cold winter mornings.

Diary of a Chain Stitcher: Sewaholic Pacific Leggings sewn in merino from The Fabric Store on the Brother Innov-is F420

I resorted to an old favourite pattern to make these; the Pacific Leggings from Sewaholic. I have about three pairs of these that have been going strong for a couple of years. I love the seam lines and the shape of the waistband sits really comfortably plus they have the practical bonus of a zip pocket at the rear. My other pairs are great for summer running and carry me through into slightly chillier weather but I needed a pair for frosty mornings so chose this lovely thick merino blend double faced fabric in black from The Fabric Store.

Diary of a Chain Stitcher: Sewaholic Pacific Leggings sewn in merino from The Fabric Store on the Brother Innov-is F420

These leggings were one of the first projects I tackled on my new Brother Innov-is F420 machine and it was a great way to get to grips with the stretch stitches it offers. I've always sewn knit fabrics on a regular machine before finishing seam allowances with my overlocker as I like the aesthetic of the overlocked stitches but find my sewing more accurate on the regular machine. It was a real treat to have a plethora of stretch stitch options to choose from rather than just a shorter/longer, wider/narrower zig zag! I tested out a variety on scraps of my fabric before I began and chose to use a combination of stitches throughout the project.

Diary of a Chain Stitcher: Sewaholic Pacific Leggings sewn in merino from The Fabric Store on the Brother Innov-is F420

I used the no.16 overcasting stitch on seams which could be finished together, such as the inside and outside leg seams. After testing all this stitches this one appeared to have the greatest amount of stretch in the stitch and responded well to being stretched around the leg and also along the seam as the leggings are pulled on. What I particularly love about this option is the stitching is not visible from the right side. With a zig zag, particularly a wide one, the gaps between stitches can look quite obvious when the seam is stretched out but this has a completely smooth finish like a straight stitch or what you might expect from an overlocked seam.

Diary of a Chain Stitcher: Sewaholic Pacific Leggings sewn in merino from The Fabric Store on the Brother Innov-is F420

The seams to construct the waistband and zip pocket need to be pressed open to reduce bulk and for these seams I chose the no.7 triple straight stitch. This stitch looks like a thick straight stitch but is created by the needle going back and forth sewing three straight stitches next to each other. This back and forth motion gives the stitch some stretch in the same manner as a zig zag. It isn't super stretchy but perfect for these shorter seams which need some give and a lot of strength. The final stitch I used was the no.12 three step zig zag stitch to attach the elastic. The manual that came with the machine handily lists all the stitches and the purposes they are best suited to and recommend this stitch for the job.

I love that the machine picks the optimum stitch width and length automatically for each stitch but you can still adjust them if you want. When you do change the automatic settings it is easy to remember what these originally were if you want to go back as these are highlighted with a dark box on the screen as you scroll through the options.

Diary of a Chain Stitcher: Sewaholic Pacific Leggings sewn in merino from The Fabric Store on the Brother Innov-is F420

One thing I will say about sewing with stretch stitches on the Innov-is F420 is that it has taken me a little while to get used to which stitches the seam allowance guide on the needle plates is accurate for. They are correct to follow when the needle is in the left hand position but if you move it to the centre or use one of the zig zag or decorative stitches this won't be an accurate guide anymore. The other thing to get used to is which stitches sew a backstitch and which stitches sew a reinforcing stitch on the spot when you press the reverse button. I've been carefully testing each stitch on a scrap and checking this and the seam allowance before I begin! Now I'm finding my favourite stitches and using them regularly I'm getting used to it. I've used pretty much only one machine for the last 7 years but the motions of using this new machine have become instinctive and automatic surprisingly quickly!

Diary of a Chain Stitcher: Sewaholic Pacific Leggings sewn in merino from The Fabric Store on the Brother Innov-is F420

This merino is quite a thick fabric with a surprising amount of stretch but resilient recovery so I'm looking forward to working with some fine and drapey knits to see how the machine and stitch selection handles those. This particular fabric has a nylon underside so combined with the breathability of merino is a great choice for sports clothing. The dense structure and spongy quality makes it completely opaque even when stretched and it has proved to be a great choice for a supportive pair of work out leggings. You could technically use either side of the fabric as the right side but I used the smooth, nylon side as the wrong side as it felt nicer against the skin. Also this side gets a bit of a shine to it when stretched and I prefer a matte look on the exterior of my activewear. The pure merino side has more of a texture with an interesting almost slubby finish.

Diary of a Chain Stitcher: Sewaholic Pacific Leggings sewn in merino from The Fabric Store on the Brother Innov-is F420

I used Maderia Aeroflock thread (similar to woolly nylon) in the bobbin to aid stretch in the seams. I've found my knit seams to be so much stronger since I've started using this thread, particularly helpful with close fitting activewear which sees a lot of strenuous use and washing. No popped seams on these yet! I find it works best when used in the bobbin for twin needle top-stitching. Which by the way this machine does a treat! For once I had no problems with tension and the detachable horizontal spool holder makes setting it up quick and easy. You actually select the twin needle function on the screen to do it which is great as the machine reminds you when you are not set up correctly to move on.

The success of this project and addition to my activewear wardrobe has certainly encouraged me to run a bit more. Although I must admit the desire to need and therefore be able to sew more activewear is what is motivating me the most! 

Sunday, 24 February 2019

Faux Suede Ulysses Trench

I fell in love with the Ulysses Trench when it was released by Victory Patterns months ago and for some reason couldn't get the idea of making it up in faux suede out of my head! It has taken me quite some time to actually get around to making it partly because I had trouble finding the fabric I wanted and mainly because my fears over working with such a different fabric took a while to overcome! I tried sewing a suede skirt years ago when I hadn't been sewing long and it was a complete disaster. I was similarly expecting hours of playing around on the machine trying to get it to sew more than one layer at a time neatly but thanks to my new Brother Innoiv-is F420 my fears were unfounded!

Diary of a Chain Stitcher: Dusky Pink Faux Suede Ulysses Trench

I spent a long time looking for the fabric as I didn't want faux suede with stretch but the slightly weightier non-stretch kind. I had in my mind that I was looking for a berry or rust colour but couldn't find it anywhere, even after ordering samples online. I ended up being quite taken with this dusky purple/pink which I came across in Classic Textiles on Goldhawk Road. It perhaps a fraction lighter in weight than what I was looking for but that actually worked out for the best and the drape is a dream match for the waterfall front.

Diary of a Chain Stitcher: Dusky Pink Faux Suede Ulysses Trench

I originally thought that using faux suede I'd want to use slightly different finishes to the pattern instructions, particularly for the pockets and rear overlay which are lined. However this faux suede is quite fine and sewed up much like a mid-weight woven fabric despite being more dense. Lining turned out to be the best way to get a nice clean finish and I'm pleased I went with it as I'm not sure the belt loops (which are actually part of the rear overlay and the reason why I fell so hard for this pattern!) would have turned out so nicely. The visible seam allowances are all finished with bias binding which you make from your lining fabric...but I got lazy and ordered my binding from The Fabric Store! This is made of a Liberty Tana Lawn called Belmont Ivy and they also stock the same fabric by the metre so it matches my lining! The ultimate sewing cheat. Buying the binding ready made saved me so much time. Their bindings are so easy to work with.

Diary of a Chain Stitcher: Dusky Pink Faux Suede Ulysses Trench

For a coat, and quite an involved project with lots of elements, this was surprisingly speedy to make. Once I had all the pieces cut out and prepped I had it pretty much finished in a day! This was definitely helped a huge amount by my Brother sewing machine which is packed with lots of features which shave time off here and there; each little bit really adds up over the course of a project like this.
As well as being super fast to thread when I was switching between black for the binding and lilac for the main sewing the knee lift in particular is my new favourite thing. It allows you to line everything up under the foot super accurately using both hands rather than having to release one hand to lower the presser foot with the lever. I wouldn't have had it on my list of essential features but in combination with the thread cutting button it noticeably speeds things up. This magic little function pulls the thread tails through to the back of the fabric and leaves two short little tails. So much faster than reaching for your scissors at the end of ever seam and a game changer for someone like me who likes to pin multiple pieces and seams and then sew them all production line style. It is possible to set the machine to backstitch and cut the threads automatically but I'm sticking with using the button while getting used to the machine! For basting or anything you want a longer thread tail for there is still a manual thread cutter on the side of the machine.

Diary of a Chain Stitcher: Dusky Pink Faux Suede Ulysses Trench

This was the first time I had sewn with faux or real suede and I was nervous about it as it behaves so differently to a lot of other fabrics. I was expecting problems with skipped stitches and fabric sticking and shifting as it ran through the machine but the F420 handled it like a dream. The machine produces such neat, even stitches. Even on a potentially tricky fabric like this! The only change I made to the regular stitch settings was to reduce presser foot pressure slightly on thicker areas as I didn't want to mark the fabric. I chose a size 80 microtex needle so it was super sharp but still had a bit of heft to push through the suede. I used the regular machine foot and had no trouble, but if your fabric is sticking you could try the Teflon coating foot to help your project glide through. If I had problems I was going to first try my walking foot but didn't need to. I know some sewers keep there walking foot on their machine all the time and mine has certainly got me out of a sticky situation or two but I find it quite hard to sew accurately with the reduced visibility created by attaching that chunky piece of kit to your machine. I prefer to save it for when I've got real shifty fabric issues and use the functions of the machine itself to handle everything else. Looking at the photos there are a couple of areas along the longer seams where things aren't perhaps hanging as well as they could but I think it is less noticeable in real life.

Diary of a Chain Stitcher: Dusky Pink Faux Suede Ulysses Trench

The worst thing about the faux suede was it wanting to stick to itself when you lay the pieces out to pin seams. Ironing was surprisingly no problem at all. I had a press cloth to hand but discovered directly applying a medium heat with no steam softened up and smoothed out the fabric a treat! No unwanted sheen or weird markings. However because you can't use a high heat it is difficult to get nice crisp pressed edges and corners and I think I would have got a better result on areas like the pocket flaps and epaulettes if using a traditional woven fabric. Topstitching is essential to achieve a nice clean edge with faux suede and the needle up/down button on the machine helped hugely with the accuracy of this on all the small elements which require sharp corners. I could effectively sew one stitch at a time until I was right at the point where I wanted to pivot.

Diary of a Chain Stitcher: Dusky Pink Faux Suede Ulysses Trench

Speaking of accurate stitching, I'm slowly getting used to the markings on the needle plate and presser feet and what the seam allowance is when the needle is in different positions. This pattern uses a variety of seam allowance sizes throughout so it is important to follow the instructions carefully instead of assuming you know the correct technique. 3/8" is used quite a lot, the marking for which I found quite hard to see on the machine as it is kind of hidden when using the regular presser foot. I got used to it with practice though. When topstitching I used the central groove on the presser foot to line my seam/fabric edge up with.

Diary of a Chain Stitcher: Dusky Pink Faux Suede Ulysses Trench

The pattern is a dream. The instructions are excellent, incredibly thorough with clear illustrations. Each part of the process is broken down into lots of little steps at that means that each element (even sewing the vent) feels straightforward and like it comes together without much effort. The instruction booklet is quite overwhelming at first glance because of it's size and detail but quite a lot of the steps are to do with the binding as the whole process of four separate steps is repeated each time a seam needs binding. I think being more detailed rather than less is a good thing and this is definitely a project you could take your time over and tackle one little step at a time. I definitely recommend taking your time sewing on the pockets and pocket flaps as getting these looking nice on the outside with even topstitching is important, but as there is no lining you can also see this stitching inside your coat! Using faux suede forced me to slow down too. I didn't want to unpick anything as it would leave permanent little holes.

Diary of a Chain Stitcher: Dusky Pink Faux Suede Ulysses Trench

The only thing I did differently to the pattern instructions was to leave the collar and front edge un-hemmed as the faux suede doesn't fray. I may go back and hem this later though as I think I could do with reducing the size of the waterfall a touch. It feels a little overwhelming on me. I did hem the bottom of the coat to give it a bit of weight and also enclose the bottom edges of the interior binding neatly. I love the effect of the binding and the fact that when you apply it the pattern cleverly tells you to end it before the hem allowance of the body and sleeve to reduce bulk when you turn it up. Little touches like this told me the pattern had been really well thought out and that the company really knows their sewing!

Diary of a Chain Stitcher: Dusky Pink Faux Suede Ulysses Trench

I adore the fact that this is a real timeless style but features some subtle and clever contemporary design elements. In particular the angled pockets and belt running through loops in the the back overlay really elevate this coat. The resulting project feels very elegant. Classic, yet modern and unique without being over-designed.

Diary of a Chain Stitcher: Dusky Pink Faux Suede Ulysses Trench

I wish I hadn't let my apprehension of possible fabric problems put me off of tackling this project for so long. I enjoyed every step of making it and am delighted with the finished garment. It has given me the confidence to try out some more unusual fabrics and make the most of my machine's features. Any suggestions as to what I try next?

Sunday, 17 February 2019

Silk Double Georgette Kimono - Zero Waste Sewing

Elbe Textiles are one of my favourite indie pattern discoveries of last year. They produce women's, mens and unisex patterns (I love Lauren's thoughts on gendered clothing in modern western society) alongside a few accessory designs. Their designs have a chic, modern, minimalist vibe and are effortlessly wearable. Just what I need in my life. Their samples are all made up in lovely tactile natural fibres and I'm drawn to their sustainable sewing ethos.

Diary of a Chain Stitcher: Elbe Textiles Zero Waste Kimono in Silk Double Georgette from The Fabric Store

A few months back owner Lauren posted a tutorial for a Zero Waste Kimono Pattern and it was the first thing I thought of when I realised I needed a lightweight cover-up for my holidays. Zero waste sewing (using up every scrap of your fabric for a project) is increasingly drawing my attention. I hate waste and I'm sure a lot of you, like me have been appalled to learn more over the last year about the impact of the clothing industry and waste from it on our planet and the people on it. How I can change my own sewing consumption and practices has been on my mind a lot recently. I get frustrated when patterns over estimate the required yardage on the envelope, leaving a hard to use up 1/2 to 3/4 of a metre left over. I have often taken to laying out my pattern pieces before purchasing fabric to see how much I really need and am delighted when I come across fabric stores where you can purchase in quantities of 10cm rather than half or whole metres. This is a simple thing that more stores should do to reduce waste.

Diary of a Chain Stitcher: Elbe Textiles Zero Waste Kimono in Silk Double Georgette from The Fabric Store

In zero waste pattern cutting working within the confines of using all the fabric you have can produce some really wonderful creative designs! What I love about this kimono tutorial is that you can easily adapt it a little to use up smaller pieces of various scrap fabrics and end up with a bit of a patchwork design. In the tutorial sample you can see they have used a contrast fabric for the bands to beautiful effect. I might have something to use all those left over half metres for after all! Lauren is currently working on a zero waste dress pattern which you can find sneaky peaks of on Instagram.

Diary of a Chain Stitcher: Elbe Textiles Zero Waste Kimono in Silk Double Georgette from The Fabric Store

I do have to hold my hands up and admit that because I wanted a slightly different kimono to the one in the blog post the garment I've made is not strictly zero waste. But in the interests of sustainability I did put all scraps to good use! I had a large piece left at the end of the fabric which was full width I hemmed it on all four sides to make a beautiful sarong. Also, as I wanted the ombre-type print to run down my garment I had to cut my body down the length of the fabric rather than on the cross as instructed in the tutorial. Cutting my hem and sleeve bands alongside this left me with a long 12cm strip which I hemmed to use as a headscarf which is proving immensely useful in the heat.

Diary of a Chain Stitcher: Elbe Textiles Zero Waste Kimono in Silk Double Georgette from The Fabric Store

This stunning 100% silk printed double georgette is from The Fabric Store. I don't often sew with georgette because it is sheer and I don't like to have to wear a slip. However, the double weight version is much more opaque whilst retaining all the gorgeous qualities of a regular georgette. In fact the added weight seems to enhance them. It is still slightly translucent and I wouldn't want to use it for a dress or skirt without lining but it is well suited to a top or lightweight jacket like this. The item listing on the website describes it as fluid and that it is! It has the most wonderful movement like liquid and using it for a loose fitting garment like this with limited seams really allows it to billow and show off. What I really do like about georgette as opposed to some silks is the matte slightly crepe finish.

Diary of a Chain Stitcher: Elbe Textiles Zero Waste Kimono in Silk Double Georgette from The Fabric Store

The more I've sewn the less print I seem to work with but this lovely non-descript abstract design is right up my street. The pattern is screen printed which gives the colour a wonderful density that is slightly stronger on one side than the other. I initially thought I would make a dramatic full length kimono as in the tutorial; how beautiful would that have been with the drape and print of this beautiful textile?! But ultimately decided that a jacket length was going to be much more practical and useful in the wilds of Southern Africa. Plus the tutorial is for fabrics 140cm wide.

Diary of a Chain Stitcher: Elbe Textiles Zero Waste Kimono in Silk Double Georgette from The Fabric Store

To make a shorter version I simply omitted the wide bands at the hem of the robe and reduced the length of the neck band appropriately. I had ordered 3 metres of the silk and had one metre left to make my sarong so if you'd like to make a short version like me you'll need 2 metres of narrow width fabric. If your fabric is wider you may be able to cut more creatively and get away with less. I let the repeat of the print down the length of the fabric dictate the length of my main body piece. I wanted the band of black to cross the body at the same height front and back. As the front and back of the kimono are one piece that sits over the shoulders my shoulder line needed to be the mid point between two black bands. My finished kimono is 85cm long from shoulder to hem.

Diary of a Chain Stitcher: Elbe Textiles Zero Waste Kimono in Silk Double Georgette from The Fabric Store

The kimono is really simple to put together, lots of straight seams, and would be a great project for a beginner as there is no fitting involved. The front band and cuffs are cleanly finished with topstitched wide bands which I really like. One thing I will say is that as I had such lovely delicate fabric to work with I wanted to use french seams but that proved problematic with the triangular 'gusset' pieces at the underarm. Things got a little messy there but I got there in the end and as always french seams turn out to be worth the hassle. If making again in a fabric suited to french seams I would omit the under arm triangles.

Diary of a Chain Stitcher: Elbe Textiles Zero Waste Kimono in Silk Double Georgette from The Fabric Store

I'm delighted with my kimono and really enjoyed the process of making this. Cutting out rectangles of fabric to create a garment from felt so free and creative. I'd love to play around with the concept a bit more. Expect a summer wardrobe made of squares and rectangles!

Sunday, 10 February 2019

Leaf Green Linen Sierra Jumpsuit

When Papercut Patterns released their Geo collection a few months back I didn't know which pattern to buy first! All six are gorgeous, contemporary styles and feature interesting shapes and pattern cutting. I'd already planned what handmade additions I wanted to make to my holiday wardrobe, but I couldn't resist adding a couple of these to to queue. First up the Sierra Jumpsuit which I made the short version of but can also be made with full length trousers.

Diary of a Chain Stitcher: Papercut Patterns Sierra Jumpsuit in Leaf Green Linen Rayon Chambray from The Fabric Store

I wanted to use a solid colour so the lovely design of the jumpsuit would be shown off and was instantly drawn to this fresh and vibrant leaf green linen/rayon chambray from The Fabric Store. The rayon in the blend gives it a slightly softer drape and smoother hand than their regular linens and the weave is slightly tighter and finer. I could not be happier with my choice to pair it with this pattern. Although you might think a fabric with a bit of weight and structure best for a jumpsuit something fairly fine is better suited to this as the bodice wants to wrap softly around the curves of the body and you don't want too much bulk around the waist.

Diary of a Chain Stitcher: Papercut Patterns Sierra Jumpsuit in Leaf Green Linen Rayon Chambray from The Fabric Store

Whilst thinking about the weight of fabrics it is important to consider this with the lining too. I almost self lined the front bodice pieces but noticed that the pattern suggested a voile which is super lightweight. This is absolutely the right suggestion to reduce bulk and keep a soft feel across the front despite there being two layers of main fabric and two layers of lining at points. The back has an interfaced facing in the main fabric as you want a little more structure here to balance things out. In the interest of using up my stash I chose some white cotton lawn for lining the front bodice pieces which worked out great in terms of weight but on reflection it would have been better if I had used a matching green. Unless I tie the front very carefully white lining wants to peek out at the top and bottom of the wrap where the fabric folds into the tie.

Diary of a Chain Stitcher: Papercut Patterns Sierra Jumpsuit in Leaf Green Linen Rayon Chambray from The Fabric Store

The bias binding used to finish the raw edge of the facing and front lining is a lovely touch if you enjoy beautiful insides. I considered making matching out of the left over chambray but then remembered this fun floral bias I've had in my stash for years! I only had about 1.5m for it and it has never found the right project until now. It makes me really happy every time I put it on.

Diary of a Chain Stitcher: Papercut Patterns Sierra Jumpsuit in Leaf Green Linen Rayon Chambray from The Fabric Store

I thoroughly enjoyed this project and found myself completely absorbed in it as the design is unique and the construction method wasn't one I could second guess. I had to follow all the instructions carefully to make it work (rather than going off piste with my own preferred methods as I often do nowadays) and I really enjoyed the challenge of trying something completely new. This is something I have noticed before with Papercut Patterns and really like. They push the boundaries and their patterns often involve interesting and unusual cutting and construction.

I really liked the pocket construction. They are not put together quite like a regular side seam pocket and sit slightly in front of the seam rather than in it. I much prefer how these wear in a trouser as this construction makes the pocket bags fall to the front where thy should be. The in seam method is great for a skirt but I've noticed on my tartan Ailakki Trousers the pocket bags often go for a walk and things start to look misshapen despite bar tacks to keep things in place.

Diary of a Chain Stitcher: Papercut Patterns Sierra Jumpsuit in Leaf Green Linen Rayon Chambray from The Fabric Store

I'm very pleased with my invisible zip and how everything matches up smoothly. The other side seam isn't quite so satisfying as I feel like the finishing around the opening in the side seam for the tie is a little messy inside. It looks great from the outside but where you have to clip the seam allowances to get everything to lay flat you end up with some messy edges and there are quite a lot of seam allowances intersecting in one area. Something I'll give some thought to next time as I'd love to make a full length version of this.

Diary of a Chain Stitcher: Papercut Patterns Sierra Jumpsuit in Leaf Green Linen Rayon Chambray from The Fabric Store

The last couple of times I've used a Papercut pattern I've gone for a PDF download but this time I treated myself to a print copy in their Black Friday sale. It is so worth the extra expense for the beautiful packaging which includes illustrated instructions printed on to the pattern sheets in a little booklet for you to assemble yourself. The layout of their instructions mean the explanation of each step is fairly brief but I find the process broken down into small enough steps that it doesn't get confusing. If you are beginner used to indie patterns which take you step by step through inserting the zip including tips and tricks don't expect that here. I definitely don't think a pattern company should be required to do that and I think the Papercut instructions are thorough and plentiful.

Diary of a Chain Stitcher: Papercut Patterns Sierra Jumpsuit in Leaf Green Linen Rayon Chambray from The Fabric Store

I cut the size XS and graded out to a size S at the hip. To be honest Papercut sizing doesn't particularly suit me, I fall across numerous sizes and I should have remembered that I'd probably have to do a bit of work to get the fit spot on. I sewed this up straight out of the envelope and the fit isn't fantastic but luckily because of the wrap bodice and tie around the waist it is quite a forgiving style in this respect. It is definitely wearable as it is but next time I'll probably go down a size at the bust and waist and up a size at the hip. The bodice feels quite roomy, which I think is partly due to it being too long on me. Taking a bit off the shoulder would probably sort out most issues, raising the armhole a little and probably preventing a bit of the gaping along the back neckline too. This is probably something I could go back in and do to this one when I get back to London. The waist isn't so much of a problem because of the tie but to tie it so it feels secure I have to pull it so tight that some of the bodice starts coming through the gap in the side seam. The shorts are definitely just a fraction too snug across the hip so the pockets are pulling open and there are a few drag lines on the upper seat. I should have noticed when looking at the measurements (as finished measurements are handily included) that there is quite a small amount of ease included in this area compared to a lot of other pattern companies.

Diary of a Chain Stitcher: Papercut Patterns Sierra Jumpsuit in Leaf Green Linen Rayon Chambray from The Fabric Store

The fit is fairly relaxed but still cut to be flattering resulting in a comfortable outfit that due to the unique design feels really trendy and stylish. I love a practical yet chic jumpsuit and want to fill my wardrobe with them! I can see me getting a lot of wear out of this one throughout London summers when I'm running around town in 30 degree but still have to turn up to a meeting looking presentable.