Thursday, 2 May 2019

Striped Cotton Zadie Jumpsuit

Do you ever see a new pattern release and feel like it was just made for you? When I first spotted the Zadie Jumpsuit (the latest design from Paper Theory) I felt like it was a garment that should already be in my wardrobe. I love that it has got buckets of style, lovely unique design features, is effortlessly wearable and practical for my lifestyle too. I know jumpsuits aren't for everyone but I am a HUGE fan and they are genuinely amongst some of the most worn garments in my wardrobe (see evidence here, here, herehere and here). So much so that I am more than happy to put up with the hassle of using the toilet!

Diary of a Chain Stitcher: Paper Theory Zadie Jumpsuit in Hairline Stripe Indigo Cotton Twill from The Fabric Store

The fabric is this Hairline Stripe Cotton Twill in Indigo from The Fabric Store. It is completely dreamy fabric to work with and wear. I adore the workwear vibe of this fabric with the combination of deep inky blue and fine stripe. adore the workwear vibe inky blue and hairline stripe. When I first saw this fabric online I instantly saw it as a traditional French workwear jacket like the Julien Chore Jacket from Ready To Sew but had to admit to myself that there probably isn't a place for one of those in my wardrobe. I was very excited when I realised I could use it for this jumpsuit instead! It was a pattern and fabric match made in heaven. When the fabric arrived it was a lighter weight of twill than I imagined which is great as it gives a bit of movement to the jumpsuit and despite it's soft hand it retains a bit of crispness which works well to emphasise the lovely cut of those legs. I would never have worn this cut of clothing a few years ago but now it is absolutely what I feel happiest in. A wide leg and semi fitted bodice...with pockets of course.

Diary of a Chain Stitcher: Paper Theory Zadie Jumpsuit in Hairline Stripe Indigo Cotton Twill from The Fabric Store

Since I first saw it the online sewing community seems to have fallen for this pattern big time. Every new version I've seen has made me like it even more. I was frustrated not to have the time to sew this up straight after the pattern releases but actually having to wait and read some reviews has paid off and saved me making a muslin! A lesson in patience and not diving head first into a new project perhaps. Quite a few people have mentioned feeling like the suit was too long through the crotch. Being fairly short at 5ft 3" and with a short body I took a gamble after measuring the pattern pieces and shortened both the bodice and crotch by 3/4" each at the lengthen shorten line. I'm so pleased I did. The waistline and those wrap ties now sit just at the point I want. I think I could actually stand to loose a little more length form the crotch as there is some room in the rear but I do like a bit a freedom to move around!

Diary of a Chain Stitcher: Paper Theory Zadie Jumpsuit in Hairline Stripe Indigo Cotton Twill from The Fabric Store

This style is designed to be worn oversized and while I like the look I was wary of my petite frame being overwhelmed in fabric, preferring a slightly neater fit at least on the top half. After analysing the finished garment measurements which are helpfully thorough in these instructions I opted to cut one size down from my measurements, the size 8. I deliberated going down to a 6 but I'm glad I didn't in the end as I wouldn't want this style to look fitted. I've had a bit of trouble fitting wrap fronts in the past and feeling exposed but this feels incredibly secure and modest without being overtly so. I think the key in a wrap is getting the bodice length right.

Diary of a Chain Stitcher: Paper Theory Zadie Jumpsuit in Hairline Stripe Indigo Cotton Twill from The Fabric Store

I've seen a few people on social media asking for fit help on this garment because of creasing around the armholes. For me, this is just the way this grown-on style of sleeve sits and in a fabric with a bit of body and crispness like this cotton it is always going to happen. It doesn't bother me one bit! I've always had a pretty relaxed attitude to fitting and my general attitude is that if it looks as good as something you'd buy in the shops (both in terms of fit and finish, and to be honest it is usually better) that is plenty good enough.

Diary of a Chain Stitcher: Paper Theory Zadie Jumpsuit in Hairline Stripe Indigo Cotton Twill from The Fabric Store

For a jumpsuit it is a pretty speedy and straightforward project. I had it sewn up in about 4 hours at the weekend without rushing. The construction is remarkably straightforward, the most fiddly element being applying the binding to the curvy front edge. My life was made considerably easier by the fact that I was using a sturdy cotton which pressed well. A nice steamy press is certainly your friend in getting this to look neat and tidy! If you're struggling in a trickier fabric I would recommend breaking down the application of the binding into smaller steps. The pattern instructions have you assemble and press the bias strip and then simply slide it over your raw edge before stitching through the whole thing in one fell swoop. You could if you liked open up the binding and stitch it to the wrong side of the fabric first, before folding it over and stitching it in place. That might give you more control around the curves and is the method I am most used to seeing in pattern instructions.

Diary of a Chain Stitcher: Paper Theory Zadie Jumpsuit in Hairline Stripe Indigo Cotton Twill from The Fabric Store

The only part of the instructions I got a little confused about was basting the ties in place before attaching the binding. Now I've done it once I understand but it made no sense to me to begin with and I felt this step could have used a better diagram, additional notch or more explanation. On first try my ties ended up basted on to point upwards instead of towards the sides! When you first sew them on it looks like they are pointing in the wrong direction but once the binding is applied you fold them back over the binding and secure in place.

Diary of a Chain Stitcher: Paper Theory Zadie Jumpsuit in Hairline Stripe Indigo Cotton Twill from The Fabric Store

I absolutely love the construction of this jumpsuit; the way it is put together and finished. It is really unique which makes it both fun to make and wear. The slit in the side seam for the tie to pass through is easy to finish in a clean and sturdy fashion and I don't feel like I've got a big hole exposing my side once done up. Throughout the process I was questioning how the area below the waist and the bound edges could possibly be finished neatly without risk of exposure but it sort of came together well without me really having to think about it. If you're not using an overlocker to finish your seams you'll probably want to go back in and extend your crotch seam stitching up to the top edge of the binding once you've applied it as that will help that area sit right. It is a little unusual to have that volume of fabric in that area but I got used to wearing it very quickly. I love the effect of the fold here. It reminds me of wrap front fisherman's trousers or a pattern from the Japanese Pattern Magic books!

Diary of a Chain Stitcher: Paper Theory Zadie Jumpsuit in Hairline Stripe Indigo Cotton Twill from The Fabric Store

The weather here in London seems to have taken a turn back to the chiller and damper side of things which is frustrating as this is about all I want to wear right now. That combination of feeling so comfortable you forget you've even got clothes on yet wearing clothes so cool you get compliments at every turn is a rare one. If you follow along with my Me-Made-May on Instagram you might get bored of seeing this soon! Speaking of Me-Made-May, I now wear mainly handmade most days so my goal for the month is to actually whittle down my wardrobe to garments I really love and get a lot of wear out of. It is hard to admit sometimes that a sewing project hasn't turned out quite the way you hoped after all the time, energy and expense put into it and even harder to part with them. I'd like to spend some time this month refashioning, repairing and altering pieces in my handmade wardrobe to give them a new lease of life. I'm also going to try and get rid of the things I'm genuinely not going to wear anymore and need ideas of how to do this in a way that feels good! I'm considering giving some away to family and friends, donating to charity, possibly a little Instagram de-stash/sale and making use of H&M's textile recycling scheme.

Are you choosing to join in with the Me-Made fun this month? And if so how?

Sunday, 14 April 2019

Waxed Cotton Desmond Backpack

The project I have to share with you today has been on quite the adventure with me over the last couple of months! This is the Desmond Roll Top Backpack from Taylor Tailor and I have definitely tested my workmanship and the pattern to the full, using it almost every day when travelling around Southern Africa and the Philippines. The picture below is at Victoria Falls and further down is another of the pack in use at Blyde River Canyon in South Africa  It has also been with me on boat trips and hikes including to the top of the second highest waterfall in the world! Now I am home it is in daily use again travelling around London for work and it has proved to be a great backpack for all purposes.

Diary of a Chain Stitcher: Taylor Tailor Desmond Backpack in Waxed Cotton from Cloth House

I chose a lovely warm red waxed cotton from Cloth House on Berwick Street and all the hardware and webbing straps I bought in a kit from Guthrie & Ghani. I'd spotted these kits at the Knitting & Stitching Show in October but been too indecisive about it to buy on the day. Luckily when I emailed them they still had a couple left! The kit is fantastic as it saves a lot of time searching for the correct findings and webbings in the colours and finishes you want. It also includes a 15% discount off the PDF pattern. Taylor does sell hardware kits for the pattern in his online shop too but they ship from the US. It certainly isn't a cheap project once you've assembled all the hardware and the waxed cotton wasn't cheap at £18/m but it was all 100% worth it for a backpack which I love and have been getting so much use out of.

Diary of a Chain Stitcher: Taylor Tailor Desmond Backpack in Waxed Cotton from Cloth House

I saved some pennies on the lining and made use of some plain black quilting weight cotton from my stash and fused it with mid-weight woven interfacing to thicken it up. I was questioning how important the mid-weight recommended choice of lining was but you really will benefit from the extra strength and structure and it will make those interior pockets nice and sturdy. I really liked the shape of the interior back pocket piece which has angled sides rather than just being a regular rectangle. This means that wen you sew it on to the rectangular markings you end up with a three dimensional shape and a roomier pocket. Very clever.

Diary of a Chain Stitcher: Taylor Tailor Desmond Backpack in Waxed Cotton from Cloth House

When I'd completed this project I really felt like I'd put my recently acquired Brother Innov-is F420 through its paces! The coating of wax on the fabric makes it very dense and tough and in some areas the layers of fabric got quite thick so your machine needs a bit of oomph to get through it but mine coped beautifully. I started out with a size 90 universal needle following recommendations online but ended up going with a size 80 microtex needle as the larger size was making quite unsightly holes where it punched through. The sharp point of the microtex needle seemed to pierce through the waxed fibres more cleanly. Speaking of unsightly holes, if you are working with wax cotton you want to avoid unpicking anything if you can! I had to in a few places and those holes won't go away! I struggled to get pins through the fabric and worried about holes so resorted to clips for the majority of construction.

Diary of a Chain Stitcher: Taylor Tailor Desmond Backpack in Waxed Cotton from Cloth House

The instructions are detailed and thorough and made complete sense. Despite it being my first backpack I didn't feel lost at any point. Assembly was fairly straightforward but I wouldn't recommend it as a beginner project as it is quite lengthy and involved and some aspects are a little fiddly, especially using heavier weight fabrics which can be tricky to manoeuvre. The most complicated elements were topstitching the edges of the three dimensional front pocket in place neatly and the straps. The straps I made more challenging for myself as my stiff fabric choice made them really difficult to turn through. I'd also opted to add batting inside the straps to give them a little padding which made turning impossible! In the end I gave up and unpicked my stitching around the straps. The holes from the stitching gave me a nice clear line to follow and press under the raw edges so I could place the strap pieces wrong sides together with the batting sandwiched in between and edge stitch them closed. The finished straps are definitely not my neatest sewing but they work! I'd highly recommend adding the padding if you are intending on carrying a bit of weight around in your pack and sort of wish I had added two layers of batting instead of one on full day hikes when my pack was heavy.

Diary of a Chain Stitcher: Taylor Tailor Desmond Backpack in Waxed Cotton from Cloth House

I love that the instructions give you a nice clean finish which is also super strong! The band along the top of the backpack is a good example of this. It serves the dual purpose of concealing the top end of the straps and all the extra lines of reinforcement stitching whilst adding a bit more strength. I didn't need to finish the edges of the wax cotton as it doesn't fray. The instructions only have you finish the edges of the patch pocket pieces as all the other raw edges are concealed within the lining. I finished the ends of webbing which would be concealed within the seams with fray check and the other ends I turned in twice and stitched. This particular webbing frays like crazy.

Diary of a Chain Stitcher: Taylor Tailor Desmond Backpack in Waxed Cotton from Cloth House

As there were only a couple of hardware kits left I didn't get a choice of colour of webbing and findings. I'm really happy with how the black and brass finish looks in combination with the wine red anyway! Switching between purple thread for the exterior and black for the webbing and webbing was a bit of a pain but luckily the F420 is really fast to thread. Everything in the hardware kit is top quality and the notions are all Prym brand. Initially the fact that the sliders are 30mm wide rather than 25mm like the rest of the kit irked me a little as they looked big on the webbing straps but actually that extra width is really useful when tightening and loosening to adjust the strap length.

Diary of a Chain Stitcher: Taylor Tailor Desmond Backpack in Waxed Cotton from Cloth House

A wonderful feature of the waxed cotton is the way it marks and wears. My backpack is now looking really quite weathered in a beautiful way! It had a few flaws in it when I bought it and now has a lot more scrapes and discolouration in it. It has a lovely beaten vintage look which compliments the style of the backpack. I absolutely adore the design, both aesthetically and practically. It has loads of pockets (three external, four internal) and the only thing I wish I had done differently was to check the size of the exterior side pockets before construction and make them a little larger. They are just a fraction too small to hold my water bottle. The interior pockets are really useful to keep small things that would easily be lost in the roomy interior. It is a good size for a laptop and it can be rolled up fairly small or kept quite big. I felt like the roll top makes it really secure and safe but it does also make it quite fiddly to get into in a hurry! I was a little concerned that my fabric choice was going to end up too structured for the roll top but it holds a nice shapely roll and softens up nicely with a bit of use. It won't stay as crisp as you find it on the roll! You definitely need something with a bit of structure for this design to hold the nice boxy bottom shape out and give the front zip pocket shape.

I didn't set out to make my bag waterproof but the combination of the waxed cotton and the roll top design does a great job of keeping everything inside dry...even at Victoria Falls where we got drenched in 'upwards rain'! You could easily make a fully waterproof version of this bag with a properly waterproof fabric and waterproof seam tape. Closet Case Patterns have some great tips on this in a post for their Kelly Anorak pattern.

Diary of a Chain Stitcher: Taylor Tailor Desmond Backpack in Waxed Cotton from Cloth House

There are quite a few features of the Innov-is F420 which help with the accuracy of your stitching and these were exceptionally useful for sewing all the tight corners on this and getting topstitching to finish neatly in the right places. I like to have the speed of the machine it cranked up to high speed for long straight lines like the side seams but turn it right down slow for curved edges like the bottom of the straps. The pedal is nice and sensitive so you can get a good variety of speeds and control going on. Being able to control the speed of the reverse stitching really helped too as there is a lot of sewing back and forth over your stitching for reinforcement. On this machine if you press the reverse button it will sew a single backwards stitch. If you press and hold the button it will very slowly slow a line of reverse stitches. If while you are holding the button down you put your foot on the pedal it will sew at the usual speeds but backwards!

Diary of a Chain Stitcher: Taylor Tailor Desmond Backpack in Waxed Cotton from Cloth House

I loved putting this bag together as it was so different to what I usually make and working with wax cotton was a new experience too. I am so pleased I took the time to make just the backpack I wanted rather than buying one. It was a really enjoyable project which I highly recommend if you're looking to make something a little bit different. 

Sunday, 7 April 2019

Paprika Linen Palisade Shorts

Diary of a Chain Stitcher: Papercut Patterns Palisade Shorts in Paprika Heavyweight Linen from The Fabric Store

One of my most worn pieces in my handmade holiday wardrobe, certainly whilst I was in Africa, I didn't have time to document before I left. They are another design from the Papercut Patterns' new collection and are again effortlessly wearable but a unique style with interesting design details. These are the Palisade Shorts which can also be made as tapered trousers. I've had this heavyweight paprika linen from The Fabric Store in my stash since last summer as I originally had them in mind for a pair of shorts using the True Bias Lander Pants pattern or possibly the Tessuti Esther Shorts but once I saw this new release I couldn't resist.

Diary of a Chain Stitcher: Papercut Patterns Palisade Shorts in Paprika Heavyweight Linen from The Fabric Store

I really put these shorts through their paces whilst travelling and I ran out of time to get them photographed beforehand so what you're seeing here is far from new! They've had a few hard washes a tumble dries in shared laundry facilities at campsites in Africa which isn't usually how I care for my linen and that combined with wearing on long hikes and dusty safari drives in the heat of the sun has really started to wear the linen in. It is faded and softened in spots and I love how it is showing its age. All my previous makes in linen from The Fabric Store have retained their rich colours well so I'm putting the slight fade of these down to the strenuous wear and rigorous laundry.

Diary of a Chain Stitcher: Papercut Patterns Palisade Shorts in Paprika Heavyweight Linen from The Fabric Store

At first glance these could appear to be a very simple pair of elasticated waist shorts but on closer inspection they have lots of well thought out features. Firstly, the faux fly. It would have been easy to eliminate this feature on these shorts and just go for a flat centre front seam, or even just topstitch the shape of a fly on the front as it serves no practical purpose. But I like that a fly is actually semi-constructed so you have a fold of fabric as you would covering a regular fly. It adds interest and a slightly more professional looking finish plus is more interesting to construct.

Diary of a Chain Stitcher: Papercut Patterns Palisade Shorts in Paprika Heavyweight Linen from The Fabric Store

Secondly I really like that the elastic and therefore ruched portion of the waistband only runs around the back and sides and the front of the shorts is kept flat. Much more flattering, particularly when using a potentially bulky bottom weight fabric. The only thing I'd do differently construction wise next time is to sew a line of stitching through the centre of the elastic from end to end to prevent it from twisting and folding, which this width of elastic really wants to do when left free inside a casing like this. It was a bit of a nightmare to sort out when it came out of the tumble dryer.

Diary of a Chain Stitcher: Papercut Patterns Palisade Shorts in Paprika Heavyweight Linen from The Fabric Store

What I love about Papercut designs is that the design details often have a practical function; like these INCREDIBLE pockets! Nearly every sewist I know loves a pocket and these shorts have huge ones the full width of the side panel. Not only are the pocket bags very generous in size but they are in fact two pockets in one. The criss cross of layers visible on the outside create two separate bags. Wonderful for keeping things safe while on safari let me tell you, but panic did ensue a couple of times when my hand couldn't locate my phone when I reached in...and it was in the other pocket bag!

Diary of a Chain Stitcher: Papercut Patterns Palisade Shorts in Paprika Heavyweight Linen from The Fabric Store

So lets talk about the screamingly obvious thing about the fit of these when you look at the front on photo...they're pretty baggy in the crotch area! I believe they're designed to be worn higher on the waist I think but they don't feel quite right there. I could tighten the elastic to they sit more snuggly but I think it is the bulk of the gathering that makes me want to push them down on my hips. To wear them like this I could do with shortening the front crotch a bit, the back rise is fine. The volume in this area means they are potentially erring on the nappy-like side of things, especially when I sit down and all that room in the front crotch becomes even more obvious. However, having said that, on holiday I didn't really care so much about how they looked but did care a lot about how comfortable they were and I think the fact that they were worn so regularly speaks for itself.

Diary of a Chain Stitcher: Papercut Patterns Palisade Shorts in Paprika Heavyweight Linen from The Fabric Store

After my experience with the Sierra Jumpsuit coming up a little small on the lower half I cut the size S and graded out to between the S and M at the hip to give myself a little extra wiggle room across the seat. I don't think I really needed the extra space in this style and the waist came out a little large, as to be expected as the measurement suggested I was closer to the XS in this area. It was easily rectified by tightening the elastic slightly.

Diary of a Chain Stitcher: Papercut Patterns Palisade Shorts in Paprika Heavyweight Linen from The Fabric Store

Another great project that I really enjoyed making from Papercut Patterns. I think now I'm not working to a deadline I could definitely benefit from making a toile of their styles to get the fit just right and remembering that they tend to come up a little long on 5ft3 me.  After two projects I'm still not quite done with their Geo collection though; I've got my eye on the Meridian Dress next! 

Monday, 1 April 2019

Printed Rayon Crepe Roscoe Blouse

Diary of a Chain Stitcher: True Bias Roscoe Blouse in Rayon Print from The Fabric Store

I've lost my motivation for sewing and blogging since I returned from my travels. Initially partly because of jet lag and a post holiday cold and then partly because of being so busy with work. Usually when I'm so busy I'll find 30 minutes here and there to work on something but what I really needed to kickstart my sewjo again was a good chunk of sewing time. I finally managed to carve out a few hours last weekend after a little cutting time one evening in the week and luckily had picked just the project to get my creative juices flowing again.

Diary of a Chain Stitcher: True Bias Roscoe Blouse in Rayon Print from The Fabric Store

This Roscoe Blouse from True Bias was an absolute dream to sew. It caused me no trouble but has some interesting little details which were nice to get absorbed in. I even enjoyed my least favourite sewing task (gathering), of which this blouse has plenty! It feels like it comes together really quickly because of the lovely raglan sleeves, which are always much quicker than setting in a traditional sleeve.

Diary of a Chain Stitcher: True Bias Roscoe Blouse in Rayon Print from The Fabric Store
Breeze showing off the volume and movement of the top!

This is the blouse version of the pattern, which also has a tunic and midi length. I'm planning a midi length version next which I think I'll wear belted. I love Kelli's sense of style and find it difficult to resist many of her patterns. I don't know why it has taken me so long to sew this one when it so perfectly nails that cross between easy to wear bohemian and sleek contemporary style. I cut the size 4 (which matches my bust and waist size for reference) and it does feel quite voluminous on my fairly petite frame and I'm wondering if I would have benefitted from sizing down or perhaps shortened it a little to balance out the proportions better. But I am really enjoying the slightly longer length paired with skinny jeans. It is equally as great tucked into my favourite high waisted trousers, my first pair of Megan Nielsen Flint Pants which are easily the most worn handmade garment in my wardrobe.

Diary of a Chain Stitcher: True Bias Roscoe Blouse in Rayon Print from The Fabric Store

The finishing techniques are well thought out and I really liked the way the neckline slit is cleaning faced to begin with and then the ties are added within the binding. This neckline slit is actually the only thing I might change on my next version as it feels quite deep on me and can be a little exposing as it moves around! I feel like I need to tie the the bow up tight to close the slit whereas I'd quite like to leave it loose or open. I can't see that anyone else has been plagued by a similar issue so it could be  because I'm quite short in the body, particularly the upper chest so next time I'll shorten the slit by an inch or so for modesty.

Diary of a Chain Stitcher: True Bias Roscoe Blouse in Rayon Print from The Fabric Store

The sleeve length and width of cuff is great. They have enough drama but yet don't get in the way as they finish mid forearm and the opening is big enough to push up above the elbow if needs be. I love the sleeves on my Dove Blouse but sometimes they are not the most practical! They have a habit of turning off my touch sensitive electric hob while I'm stirring a pot!

Diary of a Chain Stitcher: True Bias Roscoe Blouse in Rayon Print from The Fabric Store

I've never been a huge fan of stitching in the ditch which is how the bound edge of the neckline and cuffs are finished so I opted to edge-stitch my binding. I was in the mood for not pushing myself too hard and using techniques I knew I could get to turn out well! I think this still looks really neat and tidy and am pleased with the results, inside and out. If I was making myself a luxury version of this top in a delicate silk I'd definitely turn to Kelli's suggestion in the instructions to hand stitch these areas.

Diary of a Chain Stitcher: True Bias Roscoe Blouse in Rayon Print from The Fabric Store

My fabric is from The Fabric Store who have a gorgeous collection of viscose/rayon prints and colours at the moment. I was originally going to use this mustard part diamond print for this project. Unfortunately there wasn't enough of it left when I placed my order but I actually think this worked out for the best. While the mustard would have been glorious and very seventies (Debbie made an amazing two piece cami and skirt set out of it) I'd have to be in the right mood to wear such a dramatic bold blouse and I think this slightly more subtle print is more 'me' and be worn on a more regular basis. I was drawn to this five dot rayon crepe as my back up choice because of the unique block printed style. Each motif has a slightly uneven density of print which gives a hand painted look to the fabric but it is in fact screen printed. The navy is nice and rich and the motifs just the right size for garment sewing. I like that the colours are quite neutral and easy to wear; the finished top works so well with many other garments in my wardrobe and is going to be easy to style year round.

Diary of a Chain Stitcher: True Bias Roscoe Blouse in Rayon Print from The Fabric Store

I ordered 2 metres as the fabric requirements in the pattern suggested I would need it but I could have got away with less of a fabric this wide. I probably could have squeezed it out of 1m50 but would get 1m 70cm to be on the safe side. A lightweight viscose/rayon is perfect for this pattern because it is quite diaphanous and moves beautifully. The volume of this style requires a lightweight fabric with drape and movement. The gathering will look thick and puffy in anything too substantial and you want the fabric to flow around the body rather than stick out in a boxy fashion.

Diary of a Chain Stitcher: True Bias Roscoe Blouse in Rayon Print from The Fabric Store

I didn't realise until I had finished this how much I needed tops like this in my wardrobe. Tops which can be both dressy or casual depending on how you style them or which worked tucked into high waisted trousers and skirts or loose over a slimmer leg. I love it. I can see a summer of shorts, skirts and boho blouses coming right up!

Diary of a Chain Stitcher: True Bias Roscoe Blouse in Rayon Print from The Fabric Store