Wednesday, 26 September 2018

A Quick Ogden Cami Hack

The Ogden Cami from True Bias is a stalwart of many a handmade wardrobe and as well as making it up in multiple colours, prints and fabrics there is plenty of mileage to be had out of the design with some simple pattern hacking too. What I did to this version was super simple and quick but transforms the look of the top. When you've got as many versions of this pattern in your wardrobe as I do making some of them look at least a little different to the others is a must!

Diary of a Chain Stitcher: Atelier Brunette Viscose Crepe True Bias Ogden Cami Square Neck Hack

After my successful and straightforward hack of adding a faux button placket to the Ogden Cami last time I decided to get a little bit more creative and change the neckline this time. This was actually possibly even more simple than the button placket to do but makes more of a dramatic difference! The high square neckline on camisoles seems to be quite popular in RTW at the moment and gives off a bit of a nineties vibe. I think it is quite an elegant shape, especially paired with the slightly flared bodice shape of the Ogden. There are a few camisole patterns around you can use to achieve this but when you've got a cami pattern you love, why not adapt it slightly for the required effect?

Diary of a Chain Stitcher: Atelier Brunette Viscose Crepe True Bias Ogden Cami Square Neck Hack

To achieve this look I simply put paper behind the back and front pattern pieces and drew a straight line between the highest points of the neckline where the straps meet the body. Make sure to do the same to your facing pieces too. When it came to sewing it was even quicker than usual as you've eliminated part of the stay stitching and attaching the straps is slightly less fiddly. You do want to take care that they sit right at the outermost edge of the neckline though so you don't end up with a weird step. The edge of the armhole should continue smoothly up along the edge of the strap. Also make sure to under stitch across the straight neckline to help create a sharp finish.

Diary of a Chain Stitcher: Atelier Brunette Viscose Crepe True Bias Ogden Cami Square Neck Hack

The fabric I used was a couple of remnants of Atelier Brunette viscose crepe in the off white colour which I picked up from Guthrie & Ghani at the Knitting & Stitching Show in the spring. They were two tiny pieces at about half and metre and a quarter of a metre of the full width! I'd first encountered this beautiful fabric in the Atelier Brunette store in Paris when I visited in February and fell in love with it a little bit. It is soft, lightweight and diaphanous without being sheer and has a gorgeous sheen to that slightly textured right side, so lovely it almost glows. It is gorgeous to work with, apart from being a little shifty as most viscose is, and even nicer to wear with that lovely cool feeling against the skin. It isn't particularly cheap at around £17.50/m but certainly worth it for the quality. The only thing that stopped me buying it in Paris was being overwhelmed by the choice of colours, which you can see in all their glory here.

Diary of a Chain Stitcher: Atelier Brunette Viscose Crepe True Bias Ogden Cami Square Neck Hack

I stood at the G&G stand for ages trying to work out if I could squeeze the main pieces onto the half metre and the facing on to a quarter! In the end I couldn't bear to leave the fabric behind at half price. When it came to cutting out the pieces I realised the answer to my dilemma was 'not quite' and I had to shorten the main pieces slightly to fit. I actually completely adore this length though and may shorten all future camis to match! Its still long enough to tuck into my high waisted skirts and trousers but sits really nicely over a pair of mid-rise jeans too. I'm wearing it here with my Mia Jeans from the Sew Over It City Break eBook.

Diary of a Chain Stitcher: Atelier Brunette Viscose Crepe True Bias Ogden Cami Square Neck Hack

The fabric is a great match for the pattern and makes for a gorgeous soft cami. A totally different feel to the one I made up in cotton lawn. The only thing I don't like about the fabric is that in this light colour it is not 100% opaque, which isn't a problem for a relaxed top but it does mean that you can see the edge of the facing through it where two layers of the fabric give a denser colour and then that finishes. It isn't so bad in pictures but in real life it really bothers me and so this top has unfortunately not had a lot of wear. I don't think you'd have this problem with the darker colours though and I'm definitely considering investing in some more for some breezy bohemian tops and dresses.

Diary of a Chain Stitcher: Atelier Brunette Viscose Crepe True Bias Ogden Cami Square Neck Hack

I think this hack needs a bit of perfecting but its certainly wearable as it is. To get the neckline sitting where I wanted it to I shortened the straps a little more than I do usually and this has made it a tad snug under the arm holes and possibly reduced the overall length of the top a little more. The armhole situation is bearable and doesn't look bad (although is slightly more obvious across the back) but I would like to make another to rectify the issue. To do this I think I will add a bit of height to the neckline rather than dropping the armholes as this will probably be more straightforward. An extra 3/4" should do it and to keep the slightly cropped effect I'll have to take the same off the hem. When making another I'd like to either use a more opaque fabric or something very fine to change the facing into a full lining and avoid the line of the facing hem across the bust.

Diary of a Chain Stitcher: Atelier Brunette Viscose Crepe True Bias Ogden Cami Square Neck Hack

Each Ogden Cami I make feels so different to the others and mainly because of variety in fabric choice rather than hacking but I'm delighted to be able to push my use of this pattern a little further. If you're new to pattern hacking then this is a great pattern to start with as the simple shape and clean lines provide a good blank canvas with little in the way of darts and additional seam lines to complicate things. I don't think I'm done with this one yet! I'm thinking straps that tie on top of the shoulder for the next version. Have you got any other ideas?

6 comments:

  1. I don't know if the hem of the facing creates any "bump" to the outside of the cami (if it does I don't see it), but I was thinking with a lightweight drapey fabric, it might pay to turn the hem to the inside of the garment. It wouldn't look as nice on the inside, but would be smoother outside. Just a thought.

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    1. Great idea! I think that might help a little but the main problem is the density of colour where there are two layers of fabric looks so different to where there is only one. I think I see it more than anyone else though!

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  2. Could you attach a similar-coloured fabric to the facing, to extend it? There might be something in your stash.

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    1. Fantastic thought! My stash is actually quite small so unfortunately I don't have anything which will work but I'm going to keep my eyes peeled.
      I wonder if the seam line where these two pieces join will still show but it will surely be less noticeable than it is now

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  3. I love the different neckline! It’s amazing how the same pattern can look so different with different fabric and a small alteration. Your top is gorgeous!

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    1. Thanks very much! Yes drawing a simple line has completely transformed the top hasn't it!

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